Recording Expenses: Credit Card Statements vs. Credit Card Transactions

When handling credit card payments using QuickBooks, small business owners may question the difference between entering a monthly credit card statement as a bill and recording credit card transactions in real time.

Entering a monthly statement as a bill involves creating your credit card provider as a vendor. Upon receipt, the bill is entered under the vendor center pulldown menu using the statement date. The total due is recorded, after which, an option to split expenses is provided (for use with multiple transactions and expenses). Interest charges are also recorded and a payment is scheduled. A full or partial payment can be made however, when entering future bills, the user must be mindful not to enter previous unpaid balances which would result in overpayments.

When recording a bill, if a statement period’s beginning and ending dates fall in the middle of the month, the billing date combines the total charges of two months of activity. Therefore, actual expenses for the calendar month are not reported accurately.

Entering individual transactions as credit card purchases in real time is done throughout the month. Transactions are expensed as of the date of the receipt of purchase. This process is more accurate for month-end financial reporting and allows for monthly statement reconciliations.

Recording your credit card activity as it happens involves creating your credit card account as a credit card in the chart of accounts versus creating it as a vendor in the vendor list. A running balance will show on the balance sheet and will decrease when payments are applied to the credit card account.

In addition to more accurate reporting, a credit card account can be reconciled upon receipt of the monthly statement. This is done in the same manner a bank statement is reconciled by accessing the credit card register and choosing the option to reconcile. Here, interest charges are entered and a payment date is scheduled. Any returns or credits are also confirmed as processed by the vendor.

Either way expenses are recorded and payments are processed. When recording credit card transactions, your best bet is to show your credit card as a credit card on your balance sheet. This provides an accurate snapshot of your financial statements and tracks all monthly activity.

In this author’s opinion if a reconciliation is ever possible, especially if multiple company credit cards issued, choose to do so. A double-check on where your money is going is always in a small business owner’s best interest.

Recording Payroll and the Importance of Time

A small business will often employ an outside payroll service to execute their payroll and all that it encompasses including filing the required federal and state payroll reports and making tax payments. If your business opts for an outside service, you may be familiar with the reports submitted to you upon completion of your periodic payroll. But, as you know, the procedure doesn’t stop there. Accounting must then be completed.

The reports contain all details for each paycheck, tax liabilities, and payroll fees for the period; all of which become part of the company’s financial statements. However, a common occurrence for the busy owner who wears many hats is just giving the reports a quick glance to confirm the operating fund has the cash requirements to cover the scheduled deductions. The reports are then set aside for a thorough review at a later date. The problem that arises is just that – the later date.

A frequent mistake when recording the payroll out of period is taking a shortcut by making a lump sum entry and ignoring individual paychecks and their actual dates. This is especially true when a company consists of a high number of employees as doing so will save time in bookkeeping tasks that have already fallen behind. Unfortunately, this method will not only create a headache when reconciling your bank statement, but will also create inaccurate tax liabilities and expenses which will lead to bigger issues at year-end.

Reconciling to the payroll reports each pay period is crucial for expenses and liabilities to be 100% accurate. To accomplish this, record actual gross wages and accrue tax liabilities in real time. In so doing, data will be contributed for processing of annual tax returns throughout the year.

This is a bookkeeping task that needs prompt attention and one more way to save money. Your tax accountant will earn more billable time with other clients!

Get the Memo and Track your Cash

How many times have you written a check payable to cash or used cash as a form of payment? Although ill-advised due to security and tracking issues, it’s a transaction that happens more often than one would think in business practice. Whether you, a member of your staff, or an outside source is the recipient of the funds, a recording of the transaction must follow.

The reasons for a cash transaction vary and are unexplored here but it’s often simply requested by the service provider. However, the delivery of a cash payment is one of which to take note. In other words, write yourself a memo.

In all financial matters, whether using cash for your own business expense or a payment to a vendor, be sure to jot down a quick memo on the check, (or if using actual cash, a post it, or a napkin, or anything to help you remember), and record the transaction promptly. If possible, obtain a receipt and attach it to a copy of your cancelled check for proof of payment. Allocate the payment accordingly to track budgeted line items, reconciling of bank statements, and tax deductions.

Remember, your bottom line is your ultimate goal and every transaction contributes to your company’s financial statements. A quick memo will encourage you to take the transaction to completion and avoid unexplained and miscellaneous transactions in your business operations.

Bank Reconciliations – Keeping Your Cash Flowing

A stack of untouched bank statements on the corner of a desk buried in a “pending” file not only keeps one ill-informed of cash activity but also fails to keep financial statements current. If you run your business on a cash basis with minimal bookkeeping such as opting out of entering bills and processing customer invoices, the problem complicates issues further.

Relying on cash disbursements to allocate expenses and recording deposits directly to an income account rather than accounts receivable is all the more reason to promptly process bank reconciliations and its importance shouldn’t be underestimated. Human error, omitted transactions due to forgetfulness, unrecorded bank fees, and the rare bank error will throw off your check register and create future problems in your daily activities.

Data entry on a daily basis is recommended. However, if you save up your data entry tasks on a monthly basis relying on bank statements to record cash transactions, be diligent in this task. Keeping bank reconciliations up-to-date will provide an accurate analysis of your financial statements and knowing your current cash availability will empower you to make good business decisions. Lastly, you’ll protect your credit and possibly save a small fortune in bank fees to boot.

Commingling Funds in a Small Business

When funds are scarce and liabilities are due, some business owners may be tempted to combine business and personal financial obligations. However dire the circumstances, using company funds to pay personal debt and expenses or vice versa is ill-advised.

Among the transgressions that could potentially wreak havoc on your company’s financial statements are the following transactions:

  • The deposit of business checks into a personal account.
  • The transfer of funds between business and personal accounts.
  • The disbursement of business checks to pay personal credit cards and personal expenses.
  • The use of a company credit card for personal purchases.

Of the many nightmares misuse of cash creates is the confusion to be had when filing tax returns. Explaining to the IRS the differentiation between business and personal transactions when merging them is a headache you don’t need.

Commingling funds discredits the financial profile of your company. The statement of cash flows is skewed. The balance sheet is inaccurate and discrepancies surface on the profit and loss statement. The result being inaccurate tax liabilities and a bogus bottom line.

Preventing the aforementioned scenarios is simple.

  • Have a buffer. A minimum savings of six months of expenses will suffice and continue adding to it. Keep separate savings accounts for your personal and business expenses.
  • Create a budget and stick to it. Both a business and a personal budget will keep you on track and prevent overspending.
  • Limit credit card debt and pay off balances within a short period of time.
  • Deposit business checks into your business account and pay yourself. This allows disbursement of funds from the appropriate sources of income.

Remember that commingling complicates your bookkeeping and jeopardizes the progress of your business. Business income is used to support business operations which includes your paycheck.

Abiding by this simple rule of keeping distance between your business and personal financial obligations will help ensure the stability and success of your small business.